Background

U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s latest monthly operational update finds that while the agency processed fewer entry summaries in November it also saw increases in the numbers of entries targeted for forced labor and seizures related to intellectual property rights.

CBP processed 2.7 million entry summaries valued at $269 billion in November, down from 2.9 million and $365 billion in October. CBP identified nearly $6.9 billion in estimated duties to be collected, down from $7.9 billion and the second straight monthly decline.

CBP targeted 444 entries (up from 398) valued at more than $128 million (down from $129.8 million) for suspected use of forced labor in the production of imported goods, including goods subject to withhold release orders or the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act. Targeted shipments include those that are further inspected but not detained, detained and released, detained and exported, or detained and abandoned. (For more information on ST&R’s comprehensive suite of forced labor-related services, please contact us at supplychainvisibility@strtrade.com).

CBP also seized 1,536 shipments that contained counterfeit goods valued at $196 million, compared to 1,174 seizures valued at $302 million the previous month.

Finally, CBP completed 41 audits (up from 12) that identified $1.9 million in duties and fees owed to the U.S. government (up from $2,000) stemming from goods that had been improperly declared. CBP also collected more than $5.3 million of identified revenue from previously completed audits.

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