Background

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has issued a final determination concerning the country of origin of a transceiver that may be offered to the U.S. government under undesignated government procurement contracts.

According to CBP, there are three main assemblies for each transceiver: the control head assembly, the power amplifier assembly and chassis, and the microprocessor board and interface board assembly and chassis. Within these three main assemblies are five printed circuit board assemblies, three of which are produced in Australia and two in the U.S. The Australian-produced boards are non-functional at the time of importation into the U.S. Each transceiver also includes a radio chassis, a speaker, an LCD screen, looms, various molded plastic parts, and various seals and fasteners.

In ruling HQ H314982, CBP concludes that the transceiver is not a product of Australia or any other foreign country or instrumentality designated for purposes of U.S. government procurement. However, CBP defers on the issue of whether or not the transceiver qualifies as a U.S.-made end product.

Any party-at-interest may seek judicial review of this determination by April 2. CBP issues country of origin advisory rulings and final determinations as to whether an article is or would be a product of a designated country or instrumentality for the purposes of granting waivers of certain “Buy American” restrictions in U.S. law or practice for products offered for sale to the U.S. government.

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