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In the News: Steel Tariffs, TPP, EU FTA, China-Japan Talks, Russia Sanctions

Tuesday, April 17, 2018
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

U.S. eyes import quotas in Brazil steel tariff talks

“The U.S. proposal is the latest step in Brazil’s efforts to negotiate its way out of newly introduced tariffs on steel and aluminum imports to the United States.”

[Reuters]

Trump says U.S. will only rejoin Pacific trade pact if terms are improved

“Trade experts believe Trump is probably trying to placate his political base in the wake of criticism over the U.S.-China tariff standoff.”

[Reuters]

Brussels mulls offer of trade deal if Trump drops tariff threat

“One of the options under the plan the Commission is discussing is to limit a potential future trade agreement to eliminating tariffs on industrial goods, such as cars and machines, the officials said. The Commission is also keen to get some concessions from the Americans on public procurement, according to one person briefed on the talks. Another, less ambitious option would be to look at reducing non-tariff barriers, such as different safety standards on vehicle parts.”

[Politico]

China, Japan hold first economic talks in eight years

“Japan asked China to ensure the fair and free transfers of technology and exchanges of intellectual property, [foreign minister Taro] Kono told reporters … Japan also made requests of China regarding steel overproduction, Kono said. However, he denied an earlier report from Kyodo News that China had asked for Japan’s help on U.S. steel tariffs, which have been imposed on both Japan and China.”

[Bloomberg News]

Russia lawmakers draft list of U.S. imports that could be banned

“The draft legislation would give authorities the power to impose bans or restrictions in

multiple areas of trade with the United States if they deemed that Washington was threatening

Russia’s interests. The sectors listed in the draft which could be subject to bans or restrictions include U.S.-made software and farm goods, U.S. medicines that can be sourced elsewhere, and tobacco and alcohol. It gives the government the power to ban cooperation with the United States on atomic power, rocket engines and aircraft making, and to bar U.S. firms from taking part in Russian privatization deals. The provision of auditing, legal, and consulting services by U.S. firms could also be subject to bans or restrictions, and curbs could be imposed on U.S. citizens working in Russia.”

[Reuters]

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