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Legislative Update: Made in USA, Trade Preferences, Outerwear, Agricultural Exports

Friday, September 29, 2017
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

Made in USA. H.R. 3850 (introduced Sept. 27 by Rep. Fitzpatrick) would direct the Federal Trade Commission to establish labels that may be used as a voluntary means of indicating to consumers the extent to which products are of U.S. origin.

Trade Preferences. H.R. 3849 (introduced Sept. 27 by Rep. Sewell, D-Ala.) would reauthorize the U.S.-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act, extending through 2030 the duty- and quota-free treatment of apparel products manufactured with U.S. yarns, fabrics, and threads in eligible CBTPA countries (Barbados, Belize, Curacao, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St. Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago).

Performance Outerwear. The U.S. Optimal Use of Trade to Develop Outerwear and Outdoor Recreation Act (H.R. 3645, introduced Aug. 4 by Reps. Dave Reichert, R-Wash., and Earl Blumenauer, D-Wash.) would eliminate duties on imports of recreational performance outerwear. The tariff classification of many such products was revised in August 2016 in accordance with the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act.

Agricultural Exports. The Cultivating Revitalization by Expanding American Agricultural Trade and Exports Act (introduced Sept. 19 by Sens. Ernst, R-Iowa, King, I-Maine, Donnelly, D-Ind., and Collins, R-Maine) would double funding over five years for two Department of Agriculture export promotion programs. The Market Access Program allows agricultural trade associations, farmer cooperatives, non-profit trade groups, and small businesses to apply for either generic or brand-specific promotion funds to support exporting efforts. The Foreign Market Development program is largely used for the promotion of bulk commodities, helping agricultural trade associations establish permanent presences in important markets.

Venezuela. The Protecting Against Tyranny and Responsible Imports Act (H.R. 3673, introduced Sept. 5 by Rep. Coffman, R-Colo.) would ban the importation of petroleum and refined petroleum products from Venezuela. Coffman said this bill responds to the actions of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro to “consolidate his dictatorship, perpetuate the humanitarian crisis, and imprison democratically-elected officials in Venezuela.” Under this bill, the ban could not be lifted until the National Assembly elected in 2015 is reinstated.

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