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DOC News: Steel Import Monitoring Changes, Export Privilege Suspension

Monday, March 30, 2020
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

Steel Import Monitoring Changes

 

The International Trade Administration is accepting comments through April 29 on a proposed rule that would make the following changes to its Steel Import Monitoring and Analysis system.

- require import license applicants to identify the country where the steel used in the manufacture of the imported steel product was melted and poured

- expand the scope of steel products covered by the SIMA system to all steel products subject to Section 232 tariffs

- extend the SIMA system indefinitely

- expand eligibility for use of the low-value license for certain steel entries from $250 to $5,000

The ITA states that by allowing for the effective and timely monitoring of import surges of specific steel products these changes would aid in the prevention of steel product transshipment.

The purpose of the SIMA system is to provide steel producers, steel consumers, importers, and the general public with accurate information on anticipated imports of certain steel products roughly five weeks earlier than it would otherwise be available. Under this system steel import licenses obtained through an online system are required for U.S. imports of basic steel mill products. Aggregate import data collected from these licenses are updated weekly and posted here.

Export Privileges Suspended for Shipments to Iran and False Statements

The Bureau of Industry and Security has issued an order suspending the export privileges of a Singapore company and its chairman for 15 years. BIS charged the company with (1) illegally re-exporting certain seismic survey equipment to Iran that was controlled by the Export Administration Regulations for national security and anti-terrorism reasons, (2) acting knowingly in doing so, and (3) making false and misleading statements to BIS during its investigation. The chairman was charged with aiding and abetting the company in violating the EAR.

As a result, neither of these entities nor anyone acting on their behalf may directly or indirectly participate in any way in any transaction involving any commodity, software, or technology exported or to be exported from the U.S. that is subject to the EAR.

For more information on export controls and compliance, please contact attorney Kristine Pirnia.

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