News
Print PDF

Practice Areas

USDA News: Fruit Imports from Mexico, Plant Imports from EU Countries

Thursday, July 18, 2019
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

Fruit Imports from Mexico

The Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has reopened until Aug. 2 the period for public comments on pest risk analyses that evaluate the risks associated with imports of fresh mamey sapote, mombin, sapodilla, and soursop fruit from Mexico into the continental U.S.

APHIS has concluded that these fruits can safely be imported using one or more of five designated phytosanitary measures, which include importation in commercial consignments only, pre-export inspection and issuance of a certificate that the shipment is free of quarantine pests, and port of entry inspections. Mexico’s national plant protection organization would have to enter into an operational workplan that sets forth the daily procedures it would take to implement these measures.

APHIS states that if the overall conclusions of its analyses and determinations of risk remain unchanged following its consideration of any comments received it will authorize the importation of these fruits from Mexico into the continental U.S. subject to the requirements specified.

Plant Imports from EU Countries

APHIS is accepting comments by Sept. 16 on a proposal to recognize 22 European Union member countries as free from citrus longhorned beetle and Asian longhorned beetle. However, this rule would only change the import requirements for such pests for four of these countries (Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) because they are the only EU countries that have previously approved CLB and ALB host genera that are currently exempt from the category of plants not authorized pending pest risk analysis.

As a result, under this rule NAPPRA-exempt host taxa of CLB and ALB from these four countries (which are specifically listed in the attached notice) would be admissible with the current import permit requirements with a stem or root collar diameter greater than 10 cm (0.4 inches). Such taxa would also have to be grown solely on mother stock from these four countries and never grown in a country from which their importation would be prohibited.

View Document(s):

To get news like this in your inbox daily, subscribe to the Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report.

Customs & International Headlines