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Tougher Energy Conservation Standards Adopted for Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

Friday, January 06, 2017
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

The Department of Energy is imposing tougher energy conservation standards for residential central air conditioners and heat pumps after concluding that the amended standards would result in significant energy savings and are technologically feasible and economically justified. The effective date of this direct final rule will be May 8 unless adverse comments are received by April 28. However, compliance will only be required for covered products manufactured in or imported into the U.S. on and after Jan. 2, 2023.

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act defines a central air conditioner as a product other than a packaged terminal air conditioner that is powered by single phase electric current, air cooled, rated below 65,000 Btu per hour, not contained within the same cabinet as a furnace, the rated capacity of which is about 225,000 Btu per hours, and that is a heat pump or a cooling only unit.

The EPCA defines a heat pump as a product other than a packaged terminal heat pump that consists of one or more assemblies, powered by single phase electric current, rated below 65,000 Btu per hour, utilizing an indoor conditioning coil, compressor, and refrigerant-to-outdoor air heat exchanger to provide air heating, and that may also provide air cooling, dehumidifying, humidifying circulating, and air cleaning.

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