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USDA News: Export Certificate Fees, Citrus from China, Fruit from Mexico

Thursday, May 02, 2019
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

Export Certificate Fees

The Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service has announced that starting June 1 it will assess a $4.01 fee to exporters that choose to apply for export certificates electronically through the export component of the Public Health Information System.

The PHIS export component enables exporters to electronically submit, track, and manage applications for export certificates, including bundling multiple applications and supplemental documents into a single file. Foreign governments have the capability to view all export certificates issued by FSIS for product intended for their country. In addition, FSIS is able to digitally sign export certificates and electronically inventory and track export certificate information, which enables it to review exact images of export certification documents prior to approval. In the future, FSIS intends to support electronic export certification, which will allow it to transfer certification data directly to the certification system of the foreign government’s competent authority.

Click here for the latest information on the phased implementation of the export component.

Citrus from China

The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has concluded that fresh pomelo, Nanfeng honey mandarin, ponkan, sweet orange, and Satsuma mandarin can safely be imported from China into the continental U.S. using one or more of five designated phytosanitary measures. APHIS states that the national plant protection organization of China would have to enter into an operational workplan that sets forth the daily procedures it would take to implement these measures, including importation in commercial consignments only, periodic inspections of places of production throughout the shipping season, maintaining the identity and origin of the lot of fruit throughout the export process, issuance of a phytosanitary certificate with an additional declaration, port of entry inspections, and importation under a permit issued by APHIS.

Public comments on a pest risk analysis that evaluates the risks associated with imports of these citrus fruits are due by July 1. APHIS states that if the overall conclusions of its analysis and determination of risk remain unchanged following its consideration of any comments received it will authorize the importation of these fruits from China into the continental U.S. subject to the requirements specified.

Fruit from Mexico

APHIS has concluded that fresh mamey sapote, mombin, sapodilla, and soursop fruit can safely be imported from Mexico into the continental U.S. using one or more of five designated phytosanitary measures. APHIS states that the NPPO of Mexico would have to enter into an operational workplan that sets forth the daily procedures it would take to implement these measures, which include importation in commercial consignments only, pre-export inspection and issuance of a certificate that the shipment is free of quarantine pests, and port of entry inspections.

Public comments on the pest risk analyses that evaluate the risks associated with imports of these fruits are due by July 1. APHIS states that if the overall conclusions of its analyses and determinations of risk remain unchanged following its consideration of any comments received it will authorize the importation of these fruits from Mexico into the continental U.S. subject to the requirements specified.

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