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In the News: China Seizure, NAFTA, Air Cargo, Import Ban

Tuesday, May 01, 2018
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

Shanghai seizes US-made microchip equipment over IPR

“A U.S. company and a Shanghai firm have agreed to settle an intellectual property rights dispute after customs authorities seized chip-making equipment from the U.S. company at the Shanghai Pudong International Airport. … The two sides agreed to settle the dispute by offering cross licenses to each other.”

[Global Times]

NAFTA officials put top-level talks on hold until May 7 to consult with industry

“The question of how much content in a vehicle should be sourced from within the NAFTA region to qualify it for duty-free status is proving to be one of the hardest issues to resolve. U.S. negotiators initially demanded that North American-built vehicles contain 85 percent content made in NAFTA countries by value, up from 62.5 percent now. Industry officials say that has been cut to 75 percent, with production of certain components specified in areas that pay higher wages - a demand aimed at preserving manufacturing in the United States and Canada and putting upward pressure on low Mexican auto wages.”

[Reuters]

WCO advances guiding principles for pre-loading advance cargo information

“Participants were informed about the status of the PLACI pilot projects by the European Union, the United States, and Canada. The U.S. indicated that its Air Cargo Advance Screening rule was likely to be published this year, and the United Kingdom stated that it was developing another PLACI pilot project in cooperation with the U.S. On that basis, the draft guiding principles for PLACI were then endorsed” by the Technical Experts Group on Air Cargo Security.

[WCO]

Algeria to end import ban on mobiles, food, home appliances 

“Algeria plans to lift a ban on imports of cell phones, household appliances and food and bring in high customs duties instead, its trade minister said on Monday, a new attempt to generate more tax revenue to ease pressure on state finances. The North African country brought in the import ban at the start of this year with the aim of reducing spending after a fall in energy earnings. The ban replaced a license system the government imposed in 2016 in a failed attempt to ease the imports bill.”

[Reuters]

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