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Imports of Persimmons, Raspberries Allowed Under USDA Proposals

Tuesday, August 30, 2016
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

The Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is inviting comments on proposed rules that would allow imports of the following agricultural commodities.

Persimmons. Fresh persimmons from New Zealand would be allowed into the U.S. if they are produced in accordance with a systems approach that would include requirements for orchard certification, orchard pest control, post-harvest safeguards, fruit culling, traceback, sampling, and treatment with either hot water or modified atmosphere treatment. The persimmons would also have to be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate with an additional declaration stating that they were produced under, and meet all the components of, this systems approach and were inspected and found to be free of quarantine pests in accordance with the proposed requirements. Comments on this proposal are due no later than Oct. 25.

Fresh persimmons with calyxes from Japan would be allowed into the U.S. if they are produced in accordance with a systems approach that would include requirements for orchard certification, orchard pest control, post-harvest safeguards, fruit culling, traceback, and sampling. The persimmons would also have to be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate with an additional declaration stating that they were produced under, and meet all the components of, this systems approach and were inspected and found free of quarantine pests in accordance with the proposed requirements. Comments on this proposal are due no later than Oct. 31.

Raspberries. Fresh raspberry fruit from Morocco would be allowed into the continental U.S. if it is produced under a systems approach to mitigate for the fungus Monilinia fructigena. Raspberries would have to be inspected prior to exportation from Morocco and found free of this pest, imported in commercial consignments only, produced at registered places of production, field inspected for signs of M. fructigena infection no more than 30 days prior to harvest in registered packinghouses, accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate with an additional declaration stating that the conditions for importation have been met, and subject to further inspection at the port of entry into the continental U.S. Comments are due no later than Oct. 25.

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