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USDA Proposes to Allow Lemons, Expand Treatment Options for Cherimoya Imported from Chile

Tuesday, April 05, 2016
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

Lemons. The Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is accepting comments through June 3 on a proposal to list lemons from Chile as eligible for importation into the continental U.S. subject to a systems approach. Under this approach the fruit would have to be grown in a place of production that is registered with the government of Chile and certified as having a low prevalence of the Chilean false red mite and would have to undergo pre-harvest sampling at the registered production site. Following post-harvest processing the fruit would have to be inspected in Chile at an approved inspection site. Each consignment would have to be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate with an additional declaration stating that the fruit had been found free of the mite based on field and packinghouse inspections.

Cherimoya Fruit. APHIS is accepting comments through June 3 on a proposed rule that would allow the importation of fresh cherimoya fruit from Chile into the continental U.S. provided that the fruit is produced in accordance with a systems approach that includes requirements for production site registration, low pest prevalence area certification, post-harvest processing, and fruit cutting and inspection at the packinghouse. The fruit would also have to be imported in commercial consignments and accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued by the national plant protection organization of Chile with an additional declaration stating that the consignment was produced in accordance with the regulations.

Commercial consignments of fresh cherimoya fruit from Chile are currently authorized entry into all U.S. ports subject to a mandatory soapy water and wax treatment, and the proposed systems approach would be an alternative. Imports of fresh cherimoya fruit that do not meet the conditions of the proposed systems approach would continue to be allowed subject to the currently required treatment.

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