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Imports of Horses from Saudi Arabia, Figs and Tejocote Fruit from Mexico Eased

Monday, March 30, 2015
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

Horses. The Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has determined that African horse sickness is not present in Saudi Arabia and that the importation of horses, mules, zebras and other equids from Saudi Arabia presents a low risk of introducing AHS into the United States. As a result, effective March 30, such animals may be imported without the previously required 60-day quarantine. APHIS estimates that the most likely effect of this change will be an increase in the temporary movement of horses between Saudi Arabia and the United States for racing, competitions and breeding.

Figs. APHIS has authorized the importation of fresh figs from Mexico into the continental United States subject to the following phytosanitary measures.

- The figs may be imported in commercial consignments only.

- The figs must be irradiated in accordance with 7 CFR part 305 with a minimum absorbed dose of 150 Gy.

- If irradiation treatment is applied outside the U.S., each consignment must be jointly inspected by APHIS and the national plant protection organization of Mexico and accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate attesting that the figs received the required irradiation treatment and including an additional declaration stating that the consignment was inspected and found free of M. hirsutus and N. viridis.

- If irradiation treatment is applied upon arrival in the U.S., each consignment must be inspected by the NPPO of Mexico prior to departure and accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate attesting that the figs were inspected and found free of M. hirsutus and N. viridis.

- The figs are subject to inspection at the U.S. port of entry.

Tejocote fruit. APHIS has authorized the importation of fresh tejocote fruit from Mexico into the continental United States subject to the following phytosanitary measures.

- The tejocote fruit must be imported in commercial consignments only.

- Each consignment must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued by the NPPO of Mexico stating the following: “Tejocote fruit in this consignment were inspected and are free of pests.”

- Each shipment is subject to inspection upon arrival at the port of entry to the U.S.

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