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List of Foreign Goods Cited for Forced or Child Labor Adds 27, Removes One

Thursday, October 13, 2016
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

The Department of Labor has added 27 products to, and removed one from, the list of foreign-made goods that it has reason to believe are produced by child and/or forced labor in violation of international standards. The DOL is required to take steps to ensure that the goods on this list are not imported into the U.S. if they are made with forced or child labor, including working with producers to help set standards to eliminate the use of such labor.

This list, which the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2013 requires the DOL to update every two years, now totals 379 line items representing 139 products from 75 countries. Three products – potatoes, pepper, and silk cocoons – and two countries – Costa Rica and Sudan – are being added to the list for the first time.

The following goods are being added to the TVPRA list.

- granite from Burkina Faso (child labor)

- sugarcane from Cambodia and Vietnam (child labor)

- cattle from Costa Rica (child labor)

- coffee from Costa Rica and Vietnam (child labor)

- fish from Indonesia (forced labor) and Vietnam (child labor)

- tin from Indonesia (child labor)

- bricks from Iran (child labor)

- sand from Kenya (child labor)

- potatoes from Lebanon (child labor)

- gold from Nigeria, Sudan, and Uganda (child labor)

- stones from Uganda (child labor)

- silk cocoons from Uzbekistan (forced labor)

- cashews from Vietnam (child labor)

- footwear from Vietnam (child labor)

- furniture from Vietnam (child labor)

- leather from Vietnam (child labor)

- pepper from Vietnam (child labor)

- rice from Vietnam (child labor)

- rubber from Vietnam (child labor)

- tea from Vietnam (child labor)

- textiles from Vietnam (child labor)

- timber from Vietnam (child labor)

- tobacco from Vietnam (child labor)

The DOL is removing garments from Jordan from this list based on information that the use of forced labor has been significantly reduced.

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