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Export Violations Yield Penalties, Suspension of Export Privileges

Tuesday, October 08, 2013
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

The Bureau of Industry and Security has issued separate orders imposing the following penalties for various export violations.

- A California man will have his export privileges suspended through Sept. 26, 2019, as part of an agreement to settle charges that he exported and conspired to export ultrasound equipment and related accessories through Belgium to Iran without the required authorization from the Office of Foreign Assets Control. The man was also assessed an $800,000 civil penalty, although $763,000 will be suspended for two years and waived thereafter if he does not commit any further export violations during that time.

- The BIS previously suspended through July 29, 2023, the export privileges of a man charged with exporting items controlled for anti-terrorism reasons to Iran via Singapore without the required OFAC authorization and in violation of a previous order temporarily denying his export privileges. The BIS has now added to its July 2013 denial order as a related person the Singapore company of which this man is the owner and operator and that also participated in the illegal exports at issue.

- The BIS has suspended until Jan. 17, 2023, the export privileges of a man currently incarcerated in Pennsylvania after being convicted of engaging in transactions relating to exporting amplifiers to China and India without the required licenses. This man was also sentenced to a $1,000 criminal fine and a $500 assessment.

Until the dates indicated above, neither these entities nor anyone on their behalf may directly or indirectly participate in any way in any transaction involving any commodity, software or technology exported or to be exported from the U.S. that is subject to the Export Administration Regulations. However, these orders do not prohibit any export, reexport or other transaction subject to the EAR where the only items involved that are subject to the EAR are the foreign-produced direct product of U.S.-origin technology.

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