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USTR Reopens Trade Committees to Federal Lobbyists

Monday, September 08, 2014
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has amended its notices requesting nominations for members to serve on the Intergovernmental Policy Advisory Committee on Trade and the Trade Advisory Committee on Africa to reflect that federally registered lobbyists are once again allowed to serve on these committees if they are appointed to represent the interests of a nongovernmental entity, a recognizable group of persons or nongovernmental entities (an industry sector, labor unions, environmental groups, etc.), or state or local governments. Nominations may be submitted here and will be accepted on a rolling basis.

Intergovernmental Trade Policy Committee. The IGPAC provides the president, through USTR, with advice and policy recommendations on matters related to trade that have a significant relationship to the affairs of non-federal governmental interests, including any U.S. state, territory or possession and any political subdivision, agency or instrumentality thereof. To be appointed to the IGPAC, applicants must:

- be a U.S. citizen;

- if serving in an individual capacity, not be a federally-registered lobbyist;

- not be registered with the Department of Justice under the Foreign Agents Registration Act;

- be able to obtain and maintain a security clearance;

- for representative members, represent a non-federal governmental entity, including the executive and legislative branches of U.S. states, territories, possessions and political subdivisions thereof, including local, county and municipal governments, or any agency or instrumentality thereof (or an association or organization that represents the interests of U.S. non-federal governmental entities); and

- for members who will serve in an individual capacity, possess subject matter expertise regarding international trade issues relevant to non-federal governmental entities.

Trade Advisory Committee on Africa. The TACA provides the president, through USTR, with advice on issues involving trade and development in sub-Saharan Africa. To be appointed to the TACA, applicants must:

- be a U.S. citizen;

- not be a full-time employee of a U.S. governmental entity;

- if serving in an individual capacity, not be a federally-registered lobbyist;

- not be registered with the Department of Justice under the Foreign Agents Registration Act;

- be able to obtain and maintain a security clearance;

- for representative members,  represent a U.S. organization whose members (or funders) have a demonstrated interest in issues relevant to trade and development in sub-Saharan Africa or that (a) is directly engaged in the import or export of goods or sells its services in sub-Saharan Africa or (b) is an association of such entities; and

- for members who will serve in an individual capacity, possess subject matter expertise regarding international trade and development issues relevant to sub-Saharan Africa.

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