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ITC Report Examines Adding Five Cotton Products to GSP, Waiving CNL for Two Products

Thursday, September 03, 2015
Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report

The International Trade Commission released Aug. 31 the public version of its confidential report on the probable economic effect of proposed modifications to the Generalized System of Preferences.

This report provides data on U.S. production, imports, exports and consumption for the period 2012–2014 for the following five cotton articles that are being considered for designation as GSP-eligible when imported from least-developed beneficiary developing countries.

- cotton, not carded or combed, having a staple length under 28.575 mm (1-1/8 inches), not harsh or rough, not elsewhere specified or included (HTSUS 5201.00.18)

- cotton, not carded or combed, harsh or rough, staple length of 29.36875 mm or more but under 34.925 mm & white in color, not elsewhere specified or included (HTSUS 5201.00.28)

- cotton, not carded or combed, staple length of 28.575 mm or more but under 34.925 mm, not elsewhere specified or included (HTSUS 5201.00.38)

- cotton card strips made from cotton waste having staple length under 30.1625 mm and lap, sliver and roving waste, not elsewhere specified or included (HTSUS 5202.99.30)

- cotton fibers, carded or combed, of cotton fiber processed, but not spun, not elsewhere specified or included (HTSUS 5203.00.30)

The report also provides advice on potential waivers of the competitive need limitation under GSP for two products from Thailand.

- coconuts, otherwise prepared or preserved, not elsewhere specified or included (HTSUS 2008.19.15)

- copper alloys (other than brass, cupro-nickel or nickel-silver), wire, coated or plated with metal (HTSUS 7408.29.10)

CNLs represent the maximum import level of a product that is eligible for duty-free treatment under GSP. Once that limit is reached, imports of the article become ineligible unless a waiver is granted. The ITC examined whether any U.S. industry is likely to be adversely affected by a CNL waiver for these two products, whether like or directly competitive products were being produced in the U.S. on Jan. 1, 1995, and the probable economic effect on total U.S. imports and on consumers of the requested CNL waivers.

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